Manager Joe Maddon trying to do for Chicago Cubs what Bob Newhart could not

Manager Joe Maddon trying to do for Chicago Cubs what Bob Newhart could not

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail to someone

After the Chicago Cubs dropped their division tie-breaker game with the Milwaukee Brewers yesterday, manager Joe Maddon was left to rummaging through his bag of tricks to keep his young stars from being re-infected by the franchise’s century-long losing mentality.

''We're all about one-game winning streaks. I know it's psychobabble 101, but it actually works.''

— Joe Maddon, on the Chicago Cubs mentality

In the past, Maddon has freely admitted to resorting to psychobabble to keep his team looking on the bright side. It turns out that Maddon’s efforts are not the first time someone has attempted to reverse the Cubs’ fortunes using psychology.

A photo posted by cubs (@cubs) on

YOU CAN’T WIN ‘EM ALL

The “You Can’t Win ‘Em All” episode of The Bob Newhart Show first aired on February, 24, 1973. At the time, the comedy series was concluding a successful inaugural season which saw it finish as the 16th highest ranked program in the Nielsen ratings.

In the baseball-themed episode, Bob Newhart, playing fictional Chicago-based psychologist Bob Hartley, treats Cubs pitcher Phil Bender (Julian Christopher) who’s been struggling from the mound. Bender pitches a five-hit shutout in his next game, then credits Dr. Hartley for the turnaround in his postgame interview.

Bob Newhart tries to help Chicago Cubs but "You Can't Win 'Em All"

Soon, Cubs catcher Moose Washburn (Vern Rowe) also seeks Dr. Hartley’s help to get out of a prolonged batting slump. Predictably, things don’t go as smoothly as they did with Bender.

1973 CHICAGO CUBS

The real-life Cubs finished the 1973 season in fifth place in the National League East with a 77-84 record. Interestingly, 1973 was the only season between 1945 and 1984 in which the Cubs were still in contention on the last day of the regular season.

1973 Topps baseball card of Cubs pitcher Fergie Jenkins

While there wasn’t a Phil Bender on the pitching roster, Ferguson “Fergie” Jenkins led the team with a 14-16 record (3.89 ERA, 170 Ks).

2018-10-02T10:13:52+00:00 October 2nd, 2018|

Leave A Comment