Top ten largest college football stadiums by capacity topped by Wolverines’ Michigan Stadium

Top ten largest college football stadiums by capacity topped by Wolverines’ Michigan Stadium

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Among college football’s cavernous stadiums, the appropriately nicknamed Big House is the biggest of them all. Seating in excess of 115,000 fans, Michigan Stadium is not only the largest sporting venue in the United States, but the second largest in the whole world.

TOP 10 LARGEST CFB STADIUMS

Of the top ten largest football stadiums by capacity, the top three are Big Ten venues. Incredibly, the largest pro football stadium is only the ninth largest college football stadium (Los Angeles Coliseum is shared by the LA Rams and USC Trojans).

NO. 1 MICHIGAN STADIUM

Michigan Stadium, Ann Arbor, Michigan: Home to the Michigan Wolverines

Since it’s opening in 1927, Michigan Stadium has played home to a legion of legendary Wolverines football team, which produced Heisman winners Tom Harmon, Desmond Howard, and Charles Woodson. In 2013, it was also the site of the largest-ever college football crowd, when 115,109 watched the Wolverines battle it out with the Notre Dame Fighting Irish.

NO. 2 BEAVER STADIUM

Beaver Stadium, State College, Pennsylvania: Home to the Penn State Nittany Lions

Home to the Penn State Nittany Lions football team, Beaver Stadium is named after an 19th century governor of Pennsylvania, and not Oregon State’s mascot. The stadium had a record crowd of 110,753 for Penn State’s 40–7 victory over Nebraska on September 14, 2002, and is recognized for having one of the most raucous student sections in the country.

NO. 3 OHIO STADIUM

Ohio Stadium, Columbus, Ohio: Home to the Ohio State Buckeyes

Situated on the bank of the Olentangy River, Ohio Stadium, more commonly known as “The Horseshoe.” The stadium has played host to U2, The Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, and Genesis, but it never rocks out as much as during the Ohio State football games. Fueled by students in the South Stands, Buckeye fans will chant O-H-I-O by section, and sing along to The White Stripes “Seven Nation Army” after big plays.

NO. 4 KYLE FIELD

Kyle Field, College Station, Texas: Home of the Texas A&M Aggies

Kyle Field is named for Texas A&M horticulture prof who in 1904 carved out space for the stadium’s current site from agricultural land on campus. Known as ” Home of the 12th Man,” Kyle Field once packed in and SEC and state of Texas record 110,631 fans when the Aggies hosted the Ole Miss Rebels.

NO. 5 NEYLAND STADIUM

Neyland Stadium, Knoxville, Tennessee: Home of the Tennessee Volunteers

The Tennessee Volunteers football team played at Baldwin Park and Wait Field before occupying the newly-built Neyland Stadium in 1921. NFL legends Reggie White and Peyton Manning called the stadium home during their distinguished college careers.

NO. 6 TIGER STADIUM

Tiger Stadium, Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Home to the LSU Tigers

For baseball fans, Tiger Stadium refers to the erstwhile home to the Detroit Tigers, but for football fans in SEC country, it is the intimidating home turf of the Louisiana State football team. Known as “Death Valley,” it has been variously described as the loudest stadium in all of college football, worst place in the world for a visiting team, and best place in the world to watch a sporting event.

NO. 7 BRYANT-DENNY STADIUM

Bryant-Denny Stadium, Tuscaloosa, Alabama: Home to the Alabama Crimson Tide

Originally named Denny Stadium, after the university’s president from 1912 to 1932, Bryant was prepended to the name in 1975 in honor of longtime football coach Paul “Bear” Bryant. Don’t be surprised if the stadium’s name gets amended again after Nick Saban concludes his highly-successful stint as head coach. Saban-Bryant-Denny Stadium has an interesting ring to it…

NO. 8 DKR-TEXAS MEMORIAL STADIUM

Darrell K Royal–Texas Memorial Stadium, Austin, Texas: Home to the Texas Longhorns

In 1996, the University of Texas added the name of former football coach Derrell K. Royal to their stadium’s name. Royal guided the Longhorns to three national championships and eleven Southwest Conference titles from 1957-76.

NO. 9 LA MEMORIAL COLISEUM

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles, California: Home to the USC Trojans

In 2028, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum will become the first stadium to have hosted the Summer Olympics three times. When it’s not hoisting the Olympic Rings flag, it is home to the Los Angeles Rams and USC Trojans football teams.

NO. 10 Sanford Stadium

Sanford Stadium, Athens, Georgia: Home to the Georgia Bulldogs

Games played at the Georgia Bulldogs’ Sanford Stadium are said to be played “Between the Hedges” due to the field being surrounded by privet hedges, which have been a part of the design of the stadium since it opened in 1929.

2018-01-26T22:37:45+00:00 January 2nd, 2018|

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